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Journal Articles.. - Printable Version

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Journal Articles.. - Phya - 08-13-2009 2:29 AM

I'd like to use my access to article databases to find and post full articles that are relevant to the topic of pheromones. I'm not sure if: A) this is legal. B) if you're interested in these lengthy, often dense articles and C) what terms to search for exactly. I'm not able to get access to all the articles, it seems like the university only has access to a portion of the listed articles. I'll be asking the librarians about it later, but until then does anyone have comments, questions, suggestions?

Usually full PDFs are available, if I can get my hands on them, I have no problem uploading them, as long as there's no problem with hosting them here.


RE: Journal Articles.. - mark-in-dallas - 08-13-2009 9:35 AM

You are welcome to post any articles or studies you find Phya. We have no problem hosting the articles and I can't see any legal issues in providing articles that are already publicly, or at least semi-publicly available.

We have a dedicated server with plently of bandwidth, and I currently only have about 20 low usage websites on the server.

Post to your hearts content. It might be better to convert them to .txt files and post them in threads rather than uploading the pdf's though, as that would allow for them to be included when using the search function.

If you don't have the ability to convert them, I could do it for you, just let me know.


RE: Journal Articles.. - Mtnjim - 08-13-2009 1:47 PM

Phya, if it's the article database I'm thinking of, you might have licensing issues. Check with your librarians about their license terms.

Jim


RE: Journal Articles.. - Phya - 08-13-2009 4:48 PM

Mtnjim, it probably is the database you're thinking of. I will definitely check with them about the licensing terms. At the very least, the abstracts should be okay to post, right?


RE: Journal Articles.. - Mtnjim - 08-13-2009 5:03 PM

Depending on license, I'm thinking Abstract OK, full article no-no.

Jim


An an article in an article - jvkohl - 08-13-2009 8:28 PM

This white paper:

http://senseofsmell.org/papers/Human_Pheromones_Final%207-15-09.pdf

was referenced in an article in the July 30, 2009 New York Times

"Banking on a Chemical Reaction" The NYTimes article quotes me and mentions my manufacturer and marketer with links to their sites. My marketer banned me from his Forum.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/30/fashion/30skin.html?emc=eta1

The white paper is succinct and summarizes most of what is known, with the exception of the latest research being presented at scientific conferences.

James V. Kohl
http://www.pheromones.com


RE: Journal Articles.. - Phya - 08-13-2009 10:29 PM

Wow, James Kohl has already found his way here as well! Thanks for gracing us with your presence. I haven't finished reading your white paper yet, but I definitely will when I have the time. Thank you for sharing it with us.

I haven't looked into it completely, but I noticed a study done with two female twins and androstenone (among other bodily odors) was mentioned. From what I was able to read, it seemed that the two twins were raised in different environments, and the main point I'd like to read about is if those two twins reacted differently to the androstenone, or if they reacted similarly. Depending on the reaction, there may be a basis for claiming reactions to pheromones are culturally based, rather than genetically based, which is something that is often claimed (ie: Asians need less -none, Africans need more -none). I was only able to get a small excerpt, but the part I did read mentioned that one twin preferred coffee while the other preferred tea, indicating those preferences were probably due to cultural differences, but both twins did not like fish, despite fish being a major staple in Korea where one of the two twins was raised, perhaps indicating that the dislike for fish was genetic.

Either way, I still need to talk to my librarians and see what I'm able to post and gain access to.


RE: Journal Articles.. - Bella - 08-14-2009 2:40 AM

Well, hello James! Smile There ain't no grass growin'' under yer feet! P

It's nice to see you. What a treat to have you here! Thanks so much for contributing. Make yourself at home and please, feel free to express yourself. I hope you'll come by often, you're welcome here anytime. ;)


Bella


RE: Journal Articles.. - jvkohl - 08-14-2009 6:58 AM

When sample size is small, study results don't tell us much about the differences between people/groups. From a biological perspective, culture may enter the picture because social cues are associated with changes in hormone levels (and thus associated with changes in behavior: for example, a response to androstenone).

Thank you for the welcome; I'm here to try and correct some problems that marketers have created. If there's a specific article you need, I may be able to provide it.

James V. Kohl

(08-13-2009 10:29 PM)Phya Wrote:  Wow, James Kohl has already found his way here as well! Thanks for gracing us with your presence. I haven't finished reading your white paper yet, but I definitely will when I have the time. Thank you for sharing it with us.

I haven't looked into it completely, but I noticed a study done with two female twins and androstenone (among other bodily odors) was mentioned. From what I was able to read, it seemed that the two twins were raised in different environments, and the main point I'd like to read about is if those two twins reacted differently to the androstenone, or if they reacted similarly. Depending on the reaction, there may be a basis for claiming reactions to pheromones are culturally based, rather than genetically based, which is something that is often claimed (ie: Asians need less -none, Africans need more -none). I was only able to get a small excerpt, but the part I did read mentioned that one twin preferred coffee while the other preferred tea, indicating those preferences were probably due to cultural differences, but both twins did not like fish, despite fish being a major staple in Korea where one of the two twins was raised, perhaps indicating that the dislike for fish was genetic.

Either way, I still need to talk to my librarians and see what I'm able to post and gain access to.



RE: Journal Articles.. - jvkohl - 08-14-2009 7:08 AM

I plan to learn more about the U.S. subsidiary of the international chemical and consumer giant Schwarzkopf and Henkel: Dial Corporation, since they now have a "pheromone-infused" product on the market, and claim in their on-line advertising that androstadienone acts via the human VNO. As some of you here may know, I've fought against this type of misinformation for many years. You may remember the psychobabble of DrSmellThis and the since-convicted Aerchtypical Hybrid. Now we have a major corporation claiming that androstadienone does something beneficial via what research says is a non-functional organ. Admittedly, their marketing ploy is more advanced technologically than any other. But, in my opinion, it's still a ploy.

James V. Kohl
http://www.pheromones.com


(08-14-2009 2:40 AM)Bella Wrote:  Well, hello James! Smile There ain't no grass growin'' under yer feet! P

It's nice to see you. What a treat to have you here! Thanks so much for contributing. Make yourself at home and please, feel free to express yourself. I hope you'll come by often, you're welcome here anytime. ;)


Bella



RE: Journal Articles.. - mark-in-dallas - 08-14-2009 8:37 AM

Hi James! It's terrific to have you here. You were on the short list of people that we wanted to invite to the forum.

We've only just gone live with the forum this week, after a discussion last Friday when we came up with the idea to create a new and completely uncensored forum where people could talk about any and everything, so there will probably be some changes and improvements, and any suggestions you may have are welcome and encouraged.

I know you've managed to avoid much of the drama that seems to plague the pheromone industry, and it's our full intent not to become involved in any of it either. I think you'll find that as we grow you can peruse anywhere in the forums and not see any jibber-jabber, misinformation, or name throwing.

I know that reps are not important to you, but as we have for everyone else, your reps from pherotalk are good here too and have been carried over. Your reputation far excceeds the number of points you had though, so I've tacked on a few additional. Smile

Again, welcome to the forum! I look forward to reading your contributions!

Mark


RE: Journal Articles.. - renny - 08-14-2009 9:04 AM

Hi James, I wanted to add my welcome and thank you once again for your generous help sometime back. You may recall a young couple who were trying to use pheromones to help time ovulation in order to address some fertility problems. They had asked me (of all people) some questions about it and I suggested that they PM you with the questions. You went above and beyond to direct them to the proper studies. Unfortunately I lost touch with them shortly thereafter and don't know what the outcome was. So thank you for being so generous with your time then, and thank you for being here!


RE: Journal Articles.. - jvkohl - 08-14-2009 10:51 AM

Thank you. I'm not sure it's possible to avoid the drama entirely, but properly timed exits help (i.e., at the start of any drama). I tried to stay with Love-Scent since Bruce markets my products, but ultimately the science versus opinion controversies became too much for his all powerful moderators to handle.

Meanwhile, back in the scientific community.... Last April a colleague said (jokingly) I should write a scathing review of his forthcoming book on pheromones. After some discussion he realized that we were in agreement. Both of us have been concerned with marketing ploys that have given the concept of human pheromones a bad rap with a more educated audience (e.g., more that what is known by the average teen-ager about pheromones). However, my colleague was not aware that I have already detailed the immune system aspects (MHC diversity et al), which he said no one had addressed. It will be interesting to see where his book leads us both, since no one knows it all, and we have some different perspectives on what the current research (e.g., like what I presented last April) is telling us.

(08-14-2009 8:37 AM)mark-in-dallas Wrote:  Hi James! It's terrific to have you here. You were on the short list of people that we wanted to invite to the forum.

We've only just gone live with the forum this week, after a discussion last Friday when we came up with the idea to create a new and completely uncensored forum where people could talk about any and everything, so there will probably be some changes and improvements, and any suggestions you may have are welcome and encouraged.

I know you've managed to avoid much of the drama that seems to plague the pheromone industry, and it's our full intent not to become involved in any of it either. I think you'll find that as we grow you can peruse anywhere in the forums and not see any jibber-jabber, misinformation, or name throwing.

I know that reps are not important to you, but as we have for everyone else, your reps from pherotalk are good here too and have been carried over. Your reputation far excceeds the number of points you had though, so I've tacked on a few additional. Smile

Again, welcome to the forum! I look forward to reading your contributions!

Mark

Thanks. I'm glad you referred that couple to me, but also wonder what the end result might have been. Several more studies have shown what happens with social contact and hormone changes that are driven by pheromones in other mammals, and my mammalian model has become more widely known and accepted with journal/book chapter publication in late 2006/early 2007. Nevertheless, all I have is opinions on what should help with no real data from human studies to back it up. The bottom line is that, for me, it is essential to let people know that there's more to the concept of human pheromones than any marketer is going to explore with their "sex sells" approach.

James V. Kohl

(08-14-2009 9:04 AM)renny Wrote:  Hi James, I wanted to add my welcome and thank you once again for your generous help sometime back. You may recall a young couple who were trying to use pheromones to help time ovulation in order to address some fertility problems. They had asked me (of all people) some questions about it and I suggested that they PM you with the questions. You went above and beyond to direct them to the proper studies. Unfortunately I lost touch with them shortly thereafter and don't know what the outcome was. So thank you for being so generous with your time then, and thank you for being here!



RE: Journal Articles.. - Phya - 08-14-2009 12:50 PM

(08-14-2009 6:58 AM)jvkohl Wrote:  When sample size is small, study results don't tell us much about the differences between people/groups. From a biological perspective, culture may enter the picture because social cues are associated with changes in hormone levels (and thus associated with changes in behavior: for example, a response to androstenone).

Thank you for the welcome; I'm here to try and correct some problems that marketers have created. If there's a specific article you need, I may be able to provide it.

James V. Kohl

Yes, that's abosolutely true, unfortunately, separating twins at birth and raising them in different cultures is not some thing we can actively create studies for. That being said, I'm sure by small sample size, you mean ~N<20? If I read my textbook properly, I remember it saying we can begin to make accurate estimates with sample sizes as small as 40-100 people. Assuming of course, that the sample is representative of the population. Either way I will give your paper a thorough reading. Good luck on your campaign against misinformation. Smile


RE: Journal Articles.. - jvkohl - 08-14-2009 9:58 PM

I think we have very good animal models for what pheromones do and don't do, and either they do similar things to humans or not. Of course we can control our behavior, so there are times when some of us don't act like animals.

But consider the more obvious flaw in the visual appeal approach. There is no animal model of how visual appeal develops in humans. Few people deny its importance, yet no one knows how visual input becomes important to humans (as contrasted to other animals' olfactory prowess). So here we have a huge sample size (i.e., of humans) who would no doubt tell you that what they see is more important than olfactory/pheromonal input--but not a one of them can tell you why. Not very logical is it?

James V. Kohl


(08-14-2009 12:50 PM)Phya Wrote:  
(08-14-2009 6:58 AM)jvkohl Wrote:  When sample size is small, study results don't tell us much about the differences between people/groups. From a biological perspective, culture may enter the picture because social cues are associated with changes in hormone levels (and thus associated with changes in behavior: for example, a response to androstenone).

Thank you for the welcome; I'm here to try and correct some problems that marketers have created. If there's a specific article you need, I may be able to provide it.

James V. Kohl

Yes, that's abosolutely true, unfortunately, separating twins at birth and raising them in different cultures is not some thing we can actively create studies for. That being said, I'm sure by small sample size, you mean ~N<20? If I read my textbook properly, I remember it saying we can begin to make accurate estimates with sample sizes as small as 40-100 people. Assuming of course, that the sample is representative of the population. Either way I will give your paper a thorough reading. Good luck on your campaign against misinformation. Smile