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Fungus Found In Humans Shown To Be Nimble In Mating Game (Science Daily)
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Fungus Found In Humans Shown To Be Nimble In Mating Game (Science Daily)
09-03-2009 11:03 AM

Researchers have determined that Candida albicans, a human fungal pathogen, pursues both same-sex and the more conventional opposite-sex mating.

Posted on Sun, 16 Aug 2009 0255 GMT at http://us.rd.yahoo.com/dailynews/rss/sea...163750.htm
09-03-2009 11:03 AM
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Sexual orientation in yeast
09-04-2009 12:14 PM

The article you link to addresses, in part, the gene-based equivalent of sexual orientation (i.e., a-factor and alpha-factor physiologies), which extends well across species. The genetic basis of sexual orientation is also found in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, for example. "These differences arise from different epigenetic modifications of an otherwise identical MAT locus (Runge and Zakian, 1996; Wu and Haber, 1995)." see Diamond Binstock and Kohl, 1996 page 347.

The genetic conservation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha mating pheromone: GnRH, and diversification of the GnRH receptor can be used to explain the development of sexual preferences in all species. (see Kohl, 2006). However, the pheromonal explanation runs counter to what most people think is visually based attraction, and most people think they know what attracts them to others.

James V. Kohl
http://www.pheromones.com
09-04-2009 12:14 PM
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Post: #3
RE: Fungus Found In Humans Shown To Be Nimble In Mating Game (Science Daily)
09-12-2009 10:33 AM

This is news?

It is well known that yeast reproduction, while it is generally asexual, can be either bisexual or unisexual. Not only that, but like all the other fungal kingdom, yeast are capable of extensive mutations in even a single generation that will, among other things, allow them to change their sexual type. Any sexual preference can be very quickly overwhelmed by response to enviromental stresses. Like all the other members of the fungal kingdom, yeasts will do anything nessacary to reproduce and survive when their exsistence is threatened.
Yeast Mutations

Even the most commonly recognizable members of the fungal kingdom are in fact, the product of bizzare mutations.
Button Mushroon

The fact that in the experiment cited a pheromonal invitation for bisexual mating was emitted does not mean unisex mating was a response to the pheromone.

"Two haploid yeast of opposite mating types secrete pheromones, grow projections and mate.a cells produce "˜a-factor', a mating pheromone which signals the presence of an a cell to neighbouring α cells. a cells respond to α-factor, the α cell mating pheromone, by growing a projection (known as a shmoo) towards the source of α-factor. Similarly, α cells produce α-factor, and respond to a-factor by growing a projection towards the source of the pheromone. The response of haploid cells only to the mating pheromones of the opposite mating type allows mating between a and α cells, but not between cells of the same mating type.
.......................
Haploid cells are one of two mating types (a or α), respond to the mating pheromone produced by haploid cells of the opposite mating type, and can mate with cells of the opposite mating type. Haploid cells cannot undergo meiosis. Diploid cells do not produce or respond to either mating pheromone and do not mate, but can undergo meiosis to produce four haploid cells."
Mating of Yeast

Assuming that this study was not just an easy way to preserve research funding or academic position, it is yet another example of the lack of understanding of our fungal friends.
Fungus
09-12-2009 10:33 AM
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Post: #4
RE: Fungus Found In Humans Shown To Be Nimble In Mating Game (Science Daily)
09-12-2009 7:29 PM

(09-12-2009 10:33 AM)OoohYahhh Wrote:  This is news?

It is well known that yeast reproduction, while it is generally asexual, can be either bisexual or unisexual.

It is not well known that we can start with the difference in yeast that enables sexual or asexual reproduction and cross species using only conservation of the alpha-mating pheromone (i.e., GnRH) and diversification of its receptor. Olfactory/pheromonal input in mammals, and almost assuredly in humans, activates genes in GnRH-secreting neurons. This seems to be great support for a Creation via evolution model due to its initial simplicity and overwhelming complexity.

See for example: Kohl, J. V. (2007). The Mind's Eyes: Human pheromones, neuroscience, and male sexual preferences. In M. R. Kauth (Ed.), Handbook of the Evolution of Human Sexuality (pp. 313-369). Binghamton: Haworth Press.

Thank you for showing that others may be paying attention to my posts from time to time. I know that many of them are over-the-top, but it's nice to see one register. Sounds like you have a substantial background in microbiology. I do.

James V. Kohl
http://www.pheromones.com
09-12-2009 7:29 PM
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Post: #5
RE: Fungus Found In Humans Shown To Be Nimble In Mating Game (Science Daily)
09-13-2009 4:07 AM

As much as I appreciate your faith in me, with the exception of several years as a commercial mushroom grower, I am an entirely amatuer mycologist. But like most amatuer mycologists, I am ever so slightly fanatical about it.

Although I make no pretense of understanding a large part of the science, I learned long ago to pay attention to your posts. You have for a very long time been the point of the spear in defending our shared belief in the efficacy of human pheromones in the face of a still largely disbelieving mainstream scientific community. Insulated in our community of believers, it is easy to forget that even now human pheromones are still considered snake oil by modern 'science'. When this belief finally, inevitably, changes it will be in large part because of your years of persistent effort.

Your websites have been the most complete listing of past publications in both the scientific and popular press that I have found anywhere. I look forward to the updated versions of the websites. We should also give credit to our administration here at PheroTruth for posting so many of the current articles and news stories that mention pheromones.

Since you are one of the worlds leading authorities on human pheromones, I was very excited to see you become a member of this forum. I pay more attention to this forum (your posts included) than is generally believed. Your presence and posts have made a huge contribution to the vitality of this community.

BTW: If you have an interest in yeast genetics these are a couple of good resources;

Yeast Resource Center

SCEPTRANS

Additionally, there is a "virtual library" of general yeast resources;

Yeastgenome.org
(Admin, this is good example of what the Pheropedia could become)

All the forms of fungal reproduction, even random mutation, are triggered by some form of environmental stress. Commercial propogation is generally triggered with tempurature although I have had some success with irrigation, humidity, airflow, light, barometric pressure, and the atmospheric content of both oxygen and carbon dioxide. Basically anything that simulates the first cold front of fall or winter will "stress" most mushrooms into reproduction. Poor little beings are frightened into thinking "OMG, WE'RE ALL GONNA DIE! WE MUST REPRODUCE! NOW!" A few of the rare exotics that thrive in extreme conditions (say at 18,000 ft in the Himalayas) require extreme pertubation. Like being exposed to rattlesnake venom.
Intl. Journal. of Medicinal Mushrooms

Past 3 days here have been rainy and gray. This is the first cool (below 70 F) night. That's why I stayed home tonight. First light I'm going to head out and try to fondle a few of the wild ones.
09-13-2009 4:07 AM
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Post: #6
RE: Fungus Found In Humans Shown To Be Nimble In Mating Game (Science Daily)
09-13-2009 1:45 PM

Thanks for your kind comments.

(09-13-2009 4:07 AM)OoohYahhh Wrote:  BTW: If you have an interest in yeast genetics these are a couple of good resources;

Currently, it's enough for me to cite published works, including my own. Colleagues and I first published on the yeast connection in 1996.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/90472...d_RVDocSum

We even addressed the likely pheromonal correlate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to human sexual orientation: different epigenetic modifications of an otherwise identical MAT locus.

There are now more detailed works in this regard, but the details go far beyond my limited training in genetics. My focus now is on study design and execution that links human pheromones to behavior.

James V. Kohl
09-13-2009 1:45 PM
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